Tell Us Your Hospice Story

Forum 2013

 

Traveling to a destination rarely happens without adventure, mishaps, or detours, and the same goes with one’s life destination. FHPCA’s 28th Annual Forum Conference “Journey: Mapping Our Past, Paving New Roads” is about looking at the past, present, and future of hospice, but what’s more important than an industry is the people that make it work.

 

That’s why we want to know your personal
or professional hospice journey.

 

Tell us about a specific moment in your hospice journey that really made an impact in your life (please include year of event) by leaving a comment below or emailing us at info@nullfloridahospices.org*, then look for your story by visiting us online at:

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*By submitting your story you agree to allow FHPCA to post your story on it’s online channels or at the 2013 Forum conference. 

4 responses to “Tell Us Your Hospice Story”

  1. Jeanie Morris says:

    My Journey as a victim yes I use the word victim for you see that is how i truly feel , after you read my Mothers story please share your opinion . My Mom is 81 years old she had a heart attack in 2007 it took her a long while to recover , she does indeed have a list of medical conditions, but her will to live is far stronger than any medical condition she has endured over the pass years .

    Now that brings me to the present on May 13th i had walked into the Rehab were she was recovering from a leg amputation, I found her laying sideways on her bed at 10:45 am she was not responding to my voice her mouth had a droop to it , I ran and got a staff employee ( NURSE OR CNA ) They called to my Mom and she responded after several minutes and her voice was disoriented They were tiring to assure me that she was ok they gave her aspirin to bring down a fever of 101 ( which was taken under the arm ) so it could have been higher . Iam not of medical backround tried very hard to accept that everything was ok I stayed two hours more and than left to run some errands,

    My Mother was transported to the hospital at 5pm with 103 temp the ER had admitted her with Pneumonia days that follow she improved and all of a sudden , My family gets a call My Mom had to go on life support or she would not live , Now I and my two sisters remember what my Moms wishes not life support but any other means to save her life .
    My mom pulled through now the Hospital at this point just wants my mom gone . they come up with a beautiful plan , my Mom hadn’t ate or drank anything in a week due to a BI-PAP that weaken her lungs and she had a hard time with food going down the wrong way . The case manager( MAGGIE) and a fill in doctor along with hospice came in my Mothers room discharge her before her family came in and could disagree , Told her this is your option you can go to a Nursing home were by law they cannot give you anything to eat or drink, or You can go to hospice, you cannot stay at the hospital if you fight it you will be liable for your bill your insurance will NOT pay , You cannot go home . Your daughter will be liable and if she fed you she could get arrested , Hospice will let you eat and drink and you will have no bill , ( To help her decide they were medicating her with Dilaudid and haldol and God knows what else . You all should be proud my Mom reluctantly signed the paper . My sister said she look like a scared caged animal , This is so sad to think people are being forced to die ! My MOM WAS A VICTIM

    • FHPCA says:

      I am so sorry to hear about the unpleasant end-of-life experience your mother went through. However, it sounds like your problem was not with the care provided by the hospice program. Hospices do nothing to hasten death, and in fact, research has documented that for most end-of-life conditions, when compared to acute care settings, life is actually extended under hospice care. The purpose of hospice care is to help the patient live every day of life to its fullest, and when death comes, for that to occur in a setting that the patient wants, usually surrounded by loved ones and free of pain and discomfort. It is extremely difficult to watch the decline of a loved one, particularly when the hopes that one may place in the abilities of curative medical care are not realized, but as mortal beings, death it is a reality we all face. Please know that hospice programs in just about every community offer grief counseling, which could very well help you process through your experience and reconcile your feelings.

    • FHPCA says:

      I am so sorry to hear about the unpleasant end-of-life experience your mother went through. However, it sounds like your problem was not with the care provided by the hospice program. Hospices do nothing to hasten death, and in fact, research has documented that for most end-of-life conditions, when compared to acute care settings, life is actually extended under hospice care. The purpose of hospice care is to help the patient live every day of life to its fullest, and when death comes, for that to occur in a setting that the patient wants, usually surrounded by loved ones and free of pain and discomfort. It is extremely difficult to watch the decline of a loved one, particularly when the hopes that one may place in the abilities of curative medical care are not realized, but as mortal beings, death it is a reality we all face. Please know that hospice programs in just about every community offer grief counseling, which could very well help you process through your experience and reconcile your feelings.

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